Plan on Passing the ASVAB? Three Tips for Getting a Higher Score

Written by College Reunion. Posted in Ftce study, Starting a new career, Toefl ibt listening

Entry level careers

Did you know that, out of the 43 U.S. presidents, 30 have served in the Army? Many high schoolers, and even some college students, are wondering whether the military is the right entry level job for them.

One part of successfully joining the armed services is passing the ASVAB, or Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery. Having trouble studying for this important exam? Here are some tips for getting the most out of your study time, and getting into the Army with flying colors.

1. Best ASVAB Study Guide

Did you know that only about a quarter of Americans between the ages of 17 and 23 are actually qualified for military service? When you take the test, you don’t want to end up in the bottom percentile, or in category V. These applicants are actually prohibited, by law, from enlisting. To reiterate, then, it’s important to pass, and worth the investment to make sure you pass. Two of the best study guides for the test are the Kaplan ASVAB, and ASVAB for Dummies. These books will be most useful at summarizing which mathematical equations you need to know. Remember the FOIL method for solving quadratic formulas? If not, it’s time to review.

2. Picking the Right Study Guide for Your Lines

ASVAB subtest scores, or lines, are what determine military job qualification. This, in other words, is the point at which you either quality or disqualify yourself from a combat, skilled technical, field artillery, or electronics job. If you intend to study for a specific job, then you want to find a study guide that covers those particular areas. Field Artillery, for example, is determined from mathematics knowledge and comprehension, as well as arithmetic reasoning. Military.com has several available practice tests for field artillery.

3. Study Tips for ASVAB Practice Tests

Even if you don’t know much yet, take practice tests early on in your studying. These will help you prepare and study while taking into account the layout of the content and questions. These will also indicate which areas you need to devote the most time to, so that you don’t wast your time over studying material you already know pretty well. One ASVAB expert recommends spending one hour a day studying your sections, starting with the areas you are weakest, and working your way up.

Is the army your ideal entry level job?
Reference links.

Comments (12)

  • Alex Tate

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    thanks for the tips. I’m actually hoping to get a clerical job, so I don’t need to rank as high for engineering and math stuff, but I do need a lot of analytical knowledge.

    Reply

  • Sidney Wood

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    thanks for the tips. I’m actually hoping to get a clerical job, so I don’t need to rank as high for engineering and math stuff, but I do need a lot of analytical knowledge.

    Reply

  • Marc Sanders

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    thanks for the tips. I’m actually hoping to get a clerical job, so I don’t need to rank as high for engineering and math stuff, but I do need a lot of analytical knowledge.

    Reply

  • Anthony Coleman

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    thanks for the tips. I’m actually hoping to get a clerical job, so I don’t need to rank as high for engineering and math stuff, but I do need a lot of analytical knowledge.

    Reply

  • Marvin Hall

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    thanks for the tips. I’m actually hoping to get a clerical job, so I don’t need to rank as high for engineering and math stuff, but I do need a lot of analytical knowledge.

    Reply

  • Ryan Walker

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    thanks for the tips. I’m actually hoping to get a clerical job, so I don’t need to rank as high for engineering and math stuff, but I do need a lot of analytical knowledge.

    Reply

  • Adrian Griffin

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    thanks for the tips. I’m actually hoping to get a clerical job, so I don’t need to rank as high for engineering and math stuff, but I do need a lot of analytical knowledge.

    Reply

  • Walter Burke

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    thanks for the tips. I’m actually hoping to get a clerical job, so I don’t need to rank as high for engineering and math stuff, but I do need a lot of analytical knowledge.

    Reply

  • Rick Lambert

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    thanks for the tips. I’m actually hoping to get a clerical job, so I don’t need to rank as high for engineering and math stuff, but I do need a lot of analytical knowledge.

    Reply

  • Arthur Caldwell

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    thanks for the tips. I’m actually hoping to get a clerical job, so I don’t need to rank as high for engineering and math stuff, but I do need a lot of analytical knowledge.

    Reply

  • Aubree Pierce

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    thanks for the tips. I’m actually hoping to get a clerical job, so I don’t need to rank as high for engineering and math stuff, but I do need a lot of analytical knowledge.

    Reply

  • Natalie Nelson

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    thanks for the tips. I’m actually hoping to get a clerical job, so I don’t need to rank as high for engineering and math stuff, but I do need a lot of analytical knowledge.

    Reply

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